Nuclear enterprise command chiefs seek to inspire Airmen

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- The Air Force's top nuclear enterprise command chiefs speak to Team Minot Airmen during a forum held at the base theater, Oct. 18. The open dialogue gave Airmen the opportunity to communicate any issues to them. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jose L. Hernandez)

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- The Air Force's top nuclear enterprise command chiefs speak to Team Minot Airmen during a forum held at the base theater, Oct. 18. The open dialogue gave Airmen the opportunity to communicate any issues to them. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jose L. Hernandez)

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- Chief Master Sgt. David R. Nordel, 20th Air Force Command Chief, addresses Airmen regarding the importance of maintaining good morale here and looking out for one another like brother and sister, Oct. 18. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jose L. Hernandez)

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- Chief Master Sgt. David R. Nordel, 20th Air Force Command Chief, addresses Airmen regarding the importance of maintaining good morale here and looking out for one another like brother and sister, Oct. 18. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jose L. Hernandez)

MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. -- The Air Force's top nuclear enterprise command chiefs came together in a forum at the base theater here Oct. 18, and spoke directly to Team Minot Airmen about the importance of reliability in each of their missions.

Chief Master Sgt. Brian S. Hornback, command chief of Air Force Global Strike Command, led the way in explaining the importance each and every Airman contributes to the Air Force's number one priority: the nuclear enterprise.

"Because of people like you, we continue to be the best and most feared Air Force in the entire world," Hornback said of Team Minot Airmen.

The chief emphasized how the work conducted by every Airman, regardless of Air Force Specialty Code, played a role in the ability to give the President of the United States, the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State, the legitimacy of effectively conducting foreign affairs anywhere in the world.

The chiefs addressed the importance of keeping a strong morale at Minot Air Force Base to continue to effectively execute their role.

While Hornback explained many people throughout the Air Force have a negative perception of Minot, the tight-knit community that is consistent here is unique. He also said Airmen should take pride in being part of a team that truly gives hope to people around the country and the world because of the symbol for peace through power that it stands for.

The work that is done here, even in the harshest of weather conditions, ensures Team Minot's assets are ready within a moment's notice. This "sends a message to the world," Hornback said.

It's a powerful message to any adversary, that the dedication put forth by all at Minot is no game and their presence for this non-stop mission is unlike any in the world, he added.

In addition to reinforcing to the Airmen the significance of the mission, the chiefs took the time to communicate a lighter side of them that is not often expressed.

Speaking of the challenges they faced as young Airmen, they explained they don't feel they are special as chiefs because throughout their career they have made mistakes just like anybody else.

"The decisions that we make when we have problems are made in haste at times," explained Chief Master Sgt. David R. Nordel, 20th Air Force Command Chief.

As Nordel explained, this is why it is crucial to look out for one another and keep each other in check, because at the end of the day, every wingman should see each other as brother and sister.

"You are all part of an institution that has a reputation of turning out stellar men and women," added Nordel. "I worry about each and every one of you because when I look at you I see the future."

While not everybody necessarily has to become a chief one day, Nordel said in the future Airmen could be leaders, chief executive officers of companies, or supervisors in charge of leading.

"You are needed by so many people beyond yourself," said Nordel. "Thank you for what you do," he said to all Team Minot Airmen.