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841st MSFS has a new Phoenix Raven

Kobayashi completed a three-week, 12-hours-a-day qualification course to become a phoenix raven.

Second Lt. Kojiro Kobayashi, 841st Missile Security Forces Squadron flight commander, poses for a portrait Nov. 26, 2018, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Kobayashi completed a three-week, 12-hours-a-day qualification course to become a phoenix raven. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tristan Truesdell)

Second Lt. Kojiro Kobayashi, 841st Missile Security Forces Squadron flight commander, receives his raven patch from Col. Aaron Guill, 341st Security Forces Group commander Nov. 7, 2018, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Upon graduation, Kobayashi became the 2729th raven since the implementation of the phoenix raven program in 1997. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tristan Truesdell)

Second Lt. Kojiro Kobayashi, 841st Missile Security Forces Squadron flight commander, receives his raven patch from Col. Aaron Guill, 341st Security Forces Group commander Nov. 7, 2018, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Upon graduation, Kobayashi became the 2729th raven since the implementation of the phoenix raven program in 1997. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tristan Truesdell)

MALMSTROM AIR FORCE BASE, Mont. -- The opportunity for Airmen in security forces at Malmstrom to spread their wings, earn the title and become part of the elite Phoenix Ravens is rare.

One young Airman has just earned that title: 2nd Lieutenant Kojiro Kobayashi, 841st Missile Security Forces Squadron flight commander.

The 841st Missile Security Forces Squadron is celebrating his achievement.

“Kobayashi is exactly what I’m looking for in a young company grade officer,” said Capt. Caesar Baldemor, 841st MSFS operations officer.

Before he could secure a slot at the official qualification course, Kobayashi had to complete a two-day tryout process, which included a physical fitness test, a three-mile run, calisthenics and a red man fight.

Once accomplished, he boarded a plane to begin the official training that earned him the Phoenix Raven title.

The Phoenix Raven qualification course is a three-week, 12-hour daily training course at the U.S. Air Force Expeditionary Center at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey.

While there, Kobayashi underwent physically and emotionally demanding training to include aircraft searches, explosive ordnance training, unarmed self-defense techniques, use-of-force scenarios, advanced firearms proficiency and anti-hijacking operations.

“What I enjoyed most was the camaraderie that was built with the other members of my group,” he said. “Although the course isn’t long, we spent almost all of our time together, and I developed friendships and got to know good people across the Air Force.”

“I may run into those Airmen again down the road, whether we get stationed together or deploy together, or just go into another course together,” Kobayashi said. “I’ll know them and we have a common connection.”

At the end of training, the Airmen completed a simulated 13-hour field training exercise where they protected an aircraft in various scenarios ranging from curious locals to hostile groups.

Kobayashi graduated as the 2729th Raven since the program was established in 1997.

He is now qualified to provide security and assist in missions involving aircraft transportation in high-threat terrorist or criminal areas.

Being under Air Force Global Strike Command, Kobayashi’s work routine won’t drastically change while at Malmstrom, as he serves the intercontinental ballistic missile mission. That is, until he transfers to a base under Air Mobility Command.

As an officer, he can also receive more additional duties when he does transfer to a base with a Raven-specific mission.

Kobayashi's talents--in addition to being a trained, lethal, tactical personnel asset--are leading people and managing resources, and he has extraordinary interpersonal skills, said Baldemor.

"He has the vital talent critical for daily operations with our joint and coalition partners and he may be tasked in the future with a mission different from the 841st MSFS," he said.

"He perfectly and effortlessly became the example for the four brand-new second lieutenants within the squadron," Baldemor concluded. "I know he will execute and exceed commander expectations wherever he may go next."