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Recognizing the efforts of a civil servant

Brian Jolly, 341st Force Support Squadron manpower and personnel chief, poses at his desk May 8, 2017, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Jolly retired from the Air Force as a chief after serving 29 years, and now uses those same leadership techniques to lead military and civilian personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jaeda Tookes)

Brian Jolly, 341st Force Support Squadron manpower and personnel chief, poses at his desk May 8, 2017, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Jolly retired from the Air Force as a chief after serving 29 years, and now uses those same leadership techniques to lead military and civilian personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jaeda Tookes)

Brian Jolly, 341st Force Support Squadron manpower and personnel chief, writes down a projected assignment for a member May 8, 2017, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Jolly keeps track of people permanently changing stations, rank changes and any other life events going on amongst his members. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jaeda Tookes)

Brian Jolly, 341st Force Support Squadron manpower and personnel chief, writes down a projected assignment for a member May 8, 2017, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Jolly keeps track of people permanently changing stations, rank changes and any other life events going on amongst his members. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jaeda Tookes)

Brian Jolly, 341st Force Support Squadron manpower and personnel chief, served as a chief in the Air Force for 29 years and retired at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Jolly is recognized this week during Public Service Recognition week for his efforts in serving the country as a government employee. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jaeda Tookes)

Brian Jolly, 341st Force Support Squadron manpower and personnel chief, served as a chief in the Air Force for 29 years and retired at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Jolly is recognized this week during Public Service Recognition week for his efforts in serving the country as a government employee. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Jaeda Tookes)

MALMSTROM AIR FORCE BASE, Mont. -- Public Service Recognition week is celebrated the first week of May to honor those serving our country in a federal, state, county and local government capacity.

One former Airmen who dedicated 29 years to the Air Force before retiring as a chief, continues to show sincere interest and care in his people as a civil servant.

“I want to see them excel,” said Brian Jolly, 341st Force Support Squadron, manpower and personnel chief. “I firmly believe in the inverted arc chart. Instead of order coming top down, I am at the bottom supporting my team.”

According to Jolly, he was fortunate enough to work for some good people that took the time to mold him into being a leader.

“I try to make the work place a good and positive atmosphere,” Jolly said. “I don’t dwell on honest mistakes, but I do expect positive attitudes.”

Retired Master Sgt. Marcus Parks, 341st FSS force management chief, has been working as a civilian since December 2016.

“This is the first MPS I have worked in that truly feels like a family environment,” Parks said. “Mr. Jolly is my boss’ boss, and I have always felt a sort of easiness when talking to him, almost like family members than coworkers.”

According to Jolly, he has even went as far as calling his members’ parents just to let them know how great of a job they are doing.

“Everyone I work with adds value in some kind of way, whether they are military or civilian,” Jolly said.

Jolly tries to lead by example by having a positive attitude.

“To get to come back and serve in a different uniform is a great feeling,” Jolly said. “I feel absolutely privileged to come to work every day and work alongside some amazing people.”